Course Catalog

Golden Gate University offers degree and certificate programs at three teaching centers and online.

NUMBER COURSE TITLE
LAW 700A
Civil Procedure I

3 Unit(s)

This yearlong course (see Civil Procedure II) is a survey of the procedures regulating the litigation of civil disputes. Civil Procedure I covers personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, and choice of law.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 700B
Civil Procedure II

3 Unit(s)

This yearlong course (see Civil Procedure I) is a survey of the procedures regulating the litigation of civil disputes. Civil Procedure II covers elements of pleading, joinder of parties and claims, discovery, functions of court and jury, verdicts, post-judgment motions, and appeal. The main focus is the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure although comparisons will be made to the California Rules of Civil Procedure when they are materially different. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 705A
Contracts I

3 Unit(s)

This yearlong course (see Contracts II) covers basic contract law, including contract formation and legal devices designed to police the bargaining process. It also covers problems of performance, excuses from performance, breach of contract, remedies, third-party beneficiary contracts, assignments, and delegation of contract rights and duties.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 705B
Contracts II

3 Unit(s)

This yearlong course (see Contracts I) covers basic contract law, including contract formation and legal devices designed to police the bargaining process. It also covers problems of performance, excuses from performance, breach of contract, remedies, third-party beneficiary contracts, assignments, and delegation of contract rights and duties. Prerequisite: Contracts I

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 706A
Lawyering: Asylum Law

2 Unit(s)

This course aims to introduce students to the practice of asylum law. The class will provide students with a basic understanding of the requirements and procedures for obtaining asylum. During the course, students will develop specific legal skills such as handling client interviews, drafting declarations and conducting direct examinations. In addition, the course will involve consideration of issues that arise in legal practice, including working with translators and managing client expectations. This course is open only to first-year JD students.

LAW 706C
Lawyering: Environmental Law

2 Unit(s)

This course will explore the legal issues relating to private, non-governmental persons or entities seeking to enforce federal environmental laws prohibiting air pollution. Students will become familiar with constitutional and statutory requirements for federal enforcement, the core substantive strategies in the federal clean air act and various litigation skills. The course will utilize readings of cases and federal statutes and regulations as well as various exercises to develop practice skills including the drafting of legal documents, alternative dispute resolution and advocacy. This course is open only to first-year JD students.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 706E
Lawyering: Free Exercise of Religion: Current Religious Conflicts

2 Unit(s)

This two unit course takes a deep dive into the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment with a focus on how defending the "First Freedom" conflicts with other civil rights in the modern era. Students will learn the tools to prepare and submit amicus briefs in state and federal courts as well as submit comment letters to executive agencies on matters affecting the exercise of religion.

LAW 706F
Lawyering: Ecommerce and Product Counseling

2 Unit(s)

This course will focus on legal and policy considerations related to e-commerce and consumer protection, and will allow students to develop practical lawyering skills from an in-house counsel perspective. With financial services as a use case, this course will cover topics such as FTC and CFPB guidance, UDAAP risks, privacy considerations, consumer consent, transmission of payments and best practices for mobile app user interfaces. We will also analyze novel e-commerce questions applicable to all industries, including biometric authentication. Students will have an opportunity to practice fundamental skills, including product counseling, problem solving and drafting terms of use and privacy policies.

LAW 706J
Lawyering: Youth Law

2 Unit(s)

This course will introduce students to youth law in California with an emphasis on the intertwined systems of dependency, delinquency and education. Topics will include the competing interests of the State, parents and juveniles whenever children and families interact with government systems and institutions, and the sources of law and procedure governing those interactions. The course is meant to present a realistic picture of how attorneys, judges, and other professionals become involved in the lives of children as well as the myriad ethical issues arising in representation of juveniles. Students will explore each of the major phases of a typical representation including initial client interviews, negotiations, oral argument, and document drafting. This course is open only to first-year JD students.

LAW 706L
Lawyering: Criminal Investigation and Litigation

2 Unit(s)

This course explores the criminal investigative process, including an examination of the grand jury investigative process. This course will study the government's authority to use compulsory process and the subsequent litigation that can ensue from a grand jury subpoena or indictment. Students will gain exposure to the criminal process and a framework for successful litigation skills, whether in the civil, criminal, or administrative realms.

LAW 706P
Lawyering: Priv Law & Lawyering Fndmtls

2 Unit(s)

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 706Q
Lawyering: Life and Death of an Estate Plan

2 Unit(s)

This course examines the process of establishing and implementing an estate plan from a practitioner's standpoint. This course will examine the basics on how to develop an estate plan including wills, revocable trusts, power of attorney and health care directives. There will be a focus on softer skills along with key legal aspects from both a drafting standpoint as well as post death administration.

LAW 706R
Lawyering: Online Defamation and the Future of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act

2 Unit(s)

Social Media has exploded. All sides complain that the commentary on Facebook, Twitter, and other media sites is biased, unfair, or outright untrue. This course will explore why social media companies are protected by the law, and examine the advantages and disadvantages of keeping this protection. Students in this course will gain an understanding of online defamation claims, defenses, and policies behind the creation of an industry that has existed for less than thirty years.

LAW 706T
Lawyering: Trade Secret Protection & Litigation

2 Unit(s)

Trade secrets are an important-yet often overlooked-type of intellectual property that are important to virtually all businesses, especially in the Bay Area's high-technology and biotechnology industries. This course will introduce students to the substantive law, procedure, lawyering skills, strategies, and ethics involved in a typical trade secret misappropriation case. Students will gain experience in evaluating whether a valid trade secret exists, drafting a Complaint and Answer in a litigation proceeding, conducting pretrial discovery (including depositions), and drafting and arguing a pretrial dispositive motion in a simulated case. Throughout the course, students will be guided to develop practical and critical thinking skills in performing tasks (and creating work product) typical in a trade secret misappropriation case in state or federal court. This course is open only to first-year JD students.

LAW 706U
Lawyering: US Supreme Court Litigation

2 Unit(s)

This course will introduce students to the skills associated with working in judicial chambers and with Supreme Court advocacy. Students will learn the laws behind a select number of today's headline-grabbing Supreme Court cases and will explore the processes by which decision-making occurs at the Court. Using actual certiorari petitions, real appellate briefs and the recordings of oral argument from the current term of the United States Supreme Court, students will practice the skills used by clerks, judges and advocates. Assignments will include writing a bench memo or one section of a judicial opinion, preparing an oral argument memorandum, conducting appellate argument as both an advocate and a justice, and attending an oral argument. This course is open only to first-year JD students.

LAW 706V
Lawyering: Landlord-Tenant Law (HLP)

2 Unit(s)

This course will prepare HLP students for their summer real-world legal apprenticeships by teaching both the substantive law of landlord-tenant disputes and also the skills needed to use and apply the law to resolve the legal problems faced by their real clients. The course will teach students lawyering skills such as interviewing, counseling, and negotiation and to provide students with the opportunity to practice those skills in simulated exercises in preparation for their work during the summer semester, under the supervision of an experienced lawyer in real cases. The course is designed to provide students with essential feedback on their individual progress toward achieving competency in these lawyering skills. Open only to students in the Honors Lawyering Program.

LAW 706W
Lawyering: Death Penalty Appeals & Habeas Corpus Petitions

2 Unit(s)

Students will learn the substantive law of the death penalty in California and the essential skills for both direct appeals and habeas corpus petitions. Students will engage in short assignments that are designed to introduce them to death penalty litigation, including ineffective assistance of counsel claims. Students will become familiar with statutes and rules of court in order to craft successful motions and related documents.

LAW 706X
Lawyering: Privacy Law & Lawyering Fundamentals

2 Unit(s)

This course provides an introduction to Privacy Law fundamentals, including issues regarding the protection of medical and financial information, with a focus on key provisions of privacy statutes and leading cases. The changing impact of technology such as cloud-based data systems is also examined. Students will learn to negotiate and draft privacy agreements, and how to resolve disputes arising from security and privacy breaches.

LAW 706Y
Lawyering: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

2 Unit(s)

Since 1967, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has provided the public the right to request access to records from any federal agency. It is often described as the law that keeps citizens in the know about their government. Federal agencies are required to disclose any information requested under the FOIA unless it falls under one of nine exemptions which protect interests such as personal privacy, national security, and law enforcement. At its best, it prioritizes transparency, requires accountability, and opens government files to inquiry without the need for litigation. At its worst, it overwhelms government employees, wastes taxpayer dollars, and may be used by lawyers as an unethical substitute for discovery. This lawyering skills class will use real FOIA examples to provide students the opportunity to analyze cases, write, perform internet research, apply statutes and regulations, interview, work as part of a team, and learn about this area of the law.

LAW 706Z
Lawyering: Introduction to Litigation - 1st STEP

2 Unit(s)

This course will prepare 1st STEP students for their summer trial and evidence program by teaching them basic trial skills necessary to become successful litigators in the courtroom. The course will teach students an overview of litigation, including the differences between civil and criminal law. Students will participate in drafting and arguing a motion, will learn to prepare and be a good witness, and begin the process of reviewing a case file and putting together a trial. Students will end the course presenting jury addresses in a mock-trial setting. The course is designed to provide students with feedback and guidance to prepare them for the intensive summer litigation program. Open only to students applying for 1st STEP.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 707A
Rebellious Law

2 Unit(s)

This course introduces students to social justice through the lens of rebellious lawyering, which is grounded in empowering clients and communities to achieve justice. We explore how social justice lawyers approach their relationship with clients in a non-hierarchical way to best appreciate and support the goals of their clients.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 708A
Introduction to Intellectual Property Law

2 Unit(s)

This course provides an overview of the main fields of Intellectual Property (IP) Law, including trade secrets, patents, trademarks, and copyrights. It explores the theoretical justifications for providing "property-like" rights in the intangibles that each of these main doctrines of IP protects. The course examines what is protected by each type of IP, what is required to have valid IP rights, what rights the IP owner has, what limits on those rights are, and what constitutes a violation of those rights.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 710
Criminal Law

3 Unit(s)

This course focuses on the study of substantive criminal law. It examines the rules of conduct for major crimes against persons and property and the defenses to such crimes. The course also considers the development of and philosophical rationales for criminal law.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 710B
White Collar Crime in Practice

2 Unit(s)

The course will introduce students to white collar criminal law and practice, including fraud, money laundering, bribery, and related offenses. The course will cover substantive white-collar criminal law and develop real-world lawyering skills through practice exercises.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 715
Property

4 Unit(s)

This survey of interests in land covers possession versus ownership, forms of ownership, modern landlord-tenant law, restrictions on the use of land through easements and restrictive covenants, regulation of land use, and fair housing law.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 715A
Property

3 Unit(s)

This survey of interests in land covers the concepts of possession and use versus ownership, some means to acquire ownership and different forms of ownership, present interests and future estates, forms of concurrent ownership, restrictions on land use through easements and restrictive covenants, an introduction to landlord-tenant law, and basic elements of fair housing law. JD/Flex only.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 715C
Real Estate Transactions

2 Unit(s)

The purchase of a home represents the most important financial transaction in their lives for most Americans. (It is also one of the topics most frequently covered on the bar exam.) This course goes through the steps of a real estate "deal" from beginning to end, covering the roles of brokers and attorneys, drafting of contracts, dealing with physical and title defects, closing of escrow, priorities (i.e., ranking of claims against the property), title insurance, mortgage financing, and income tax consequences. The course is a prerequisite for Real Estate Finance. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite: Property

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 720
Torts

4 Unit(s)

This introductory course considers the elements of and defenses to intentional torts, negligence and strict liability, including liability for defective products. The legal principles in each subject area and the policies underlying them are extensively analyzed and explored.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 720A
Torts

3 Unit(s)

This introductory course considers the elements of and defenses to intentional torts, negligence and strict liability, including liability for defective products. The legal principles in each subject area and the policies underlying them are extensively analyzed and explored. Offered for the JD Flex Program only.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 720G
Privacy, Defamation, and Other Relational Torts

2 Unit(s)

This course is an intensive examination of relational torts, including privacy, defamation, interference with economic relationships, interference with family relationships, and abuse of the litigation process. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite: Torts (4-units).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 725A
Legal Writing and Research I

2 Unit(s)

This course is focused on developing legal analysis, organization, writing, research, and citation skills in the context of drafting predictive memoranda responding to specific legal problems.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 725B
Legal Writing and Research II

3 Unit(s)

This course is focused on building on the legal analysis, organization, writing, research, and citation skills developed in Legal Writing and Research I in the context of drafting a persuasive trial-level motion. Oral communication skills are also introduced. Prerequisite: Legal Writing and Research I

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 727E
Advanced Legal Research (HLP)

2 Unit(s)

This course explains the structure and use of legal materials. The goal is research proficiency, especially in a virtual law library. Each student is responsible for using the various online research tools, theories, and strategies presented by the instructors to complete weekly exercises and compile a comprehensive research memorandum/guide. Hard copy and electronic resources will be compared to explore their relative strengths and weaknesses, so students can also expect to sharpen their research skills with traditional print materials. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. This course is open only to Honors Lawyering Program students effective Fall 2020.

LAW 727P
Advanced Legal Research

2 Unit(s)

This course explains the structure and use of legal materials. The goal is research proficiency, especially in a virtual law library. Each student is responsible for using the various online research tools, theories, and strategies presented by the instructors to complete weekly exercises and compile a comprehensive research memorandum/guide. Hard copy and electronic resources will be compared to explore their relative strengths and weaknesses, so students can also expect to sharpen their research skills with traditional print materials. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 732
Appellate Advocacy

2 Unit(s)

This course builds on the writing skills developed in the first year of law school. Students prepare appellate briefs and present oral arguments in a moot court program. This course teaches written and oral advocacy in the context of a simulated appellate case file. Students will learn about the appellate process, develop research and analysis skills, prepare an appellate brief, hone critical writing skills, and present oral arguments. In addition to providing a substantial writing experience and deeper understanding of advocacy, the course prepares students to represent GGU in extramural moot court competitions. Successful participants may be invited to join the Moot Court Board. This course satisfies the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course. Prerequisite: Writing and Research I and II.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 740
Sales

2 Unit(s)

UCC - Sales deals with contracts involving the distribution of products in our economy. Its primary focus is on sales of goods under the Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code with some coverage of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods (CISG). The course builds directly on the first year Contracts course and may be a good transition course for students uncomfortable with commercial law as it exposes them to Uniform Commercial Code interpretation in a context more familiar than other UCC courses. State bar exams cover Article 2 of the UCC both in multi-state and written formats.

LAW 743
Cyberlaw

3 Unit(s)

This course covers the key issues in cyberspace law. Students explore the application of traditional legal principles to this technology and examine issues regarding regulation of access, the impact of code architecture on regulation of conduct, and jurisdictional issues (both domestic and international). This course also covers the basics of e-commerce, including digital certification/verification, UCITA, EDI, and EFI. Emphasis is placed on issues relating to privacy and indecent materials online.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 743B
Privacy Law

3 Unit(s)

This course explores the genesis of and current state of the area of law commonly known as 'data protection' or 'privacy' law. We will compare approaches and requirements of various countries and regions (including where there are tensions between and among such laws), focus on privacy issues across various industry sectors, and explore options for national and international compliance, including with respect to surveillance by companies, in the workplace, and by government. We will also consider various uses of and protections as applied to privacy policies, email/spam, and children online. Students examine new and pending Internet and privacy-related legislation and its impact on business and technology. Recommended co-requisite: Cyberlaw

LAW 743C
Privacy Law & Technology

3 Unit(s)

This course explores the current and rapidly evolving state of the area of privacy law. We will concentrate on privacy issues raised by developments in technology and explore a range of legal approaches and responses, evaluating their effectiveness, consistency, and practicability. Students examine current and emerging technologies as well as attempts at regulation to determine the effectiveness and the impact on business and technology. This course satisfies the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course. No prerequisites, but Cyberlaw & Privacy (LAW 743B) is recommended.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 743D
Constitutional Privacy

2 Unit(s)

In overturning Roe v Wade, the Supreme Court in Dobbs v. Mississippi issued a major statement on the idea of constitutional privacy. In this course, as described below, we will explore constitutional privacy in the wake of the Dobbs decision as well as privacy precedents that pre-date and presumably survive Dobbs. A constitutional right of privacy has been found to exist in a variety of settings, including the right to family planning (contraceptive access and use), the right to be free of unreasonable searches, the right to same-sex and interracial marriage, the right to bodily integrity, the right to keep certain information private, the right to the privacy of one's own home, the right to privately associate. Yet, there is no direct pronouncement of a right of privacy in the United States Constitution. How can that be? What do all these privacy rights have in common? Does the 14th Amendment Liberty Clause present the answer? By examining the Dobbs decision, the varieties of constitutional privacy rights, and how and where the Supreme Court has found them, the student will acquire (1) an understanding of the constitutional basis to the right of privacy; (2) the facility to articulate that understanding; and most importantly, (3) the ability to apply this understanding to a variety of settings. Relevant to our times (and if time permits), we will examine governmental responses to the coronavirus pandemic and how such responses impact the constitutional right to privacy. In particular, how do vaccinations, testing, tracking, and tracing impact privacy rights? Does the health and safety of the community justify the intrusion into our privacy rights? We will endeavor to answer these questions as we learn about the right to privacy. As a threshold question, what do we mean when we talk about a right of privacy? Through our course discussions, each student will develop their own answer to this question and articulate it in a short paper. Unlike the United States Constitution, the California Constitution explicitly articulates a right of privacy. By examining California's constitutional right of privacy, each student will develop an understanding of how, if at all, it differs from its U.S. constitutional counterpart and how to apply it to a variety of settings.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 743E
Blockchain and the Law

2 Unit(s)

Blockchain technology represents new challenges and opportunities for lawyers. This course is an introduction to blockchain technology and related legal and regulatory issues. Previous technical experience is not required. Students will (1) learn the core technologies of blockchain, including the technical aspects of cryptocurrencies and smart contracts; (2) analyze the real-world application of blockchain in various use cases; and (3) evaluate the way lawmakers and regulators are dealing with this cutting-edge technology, particularly in the area of securities law. Ethical considerations will be discussed throughout the course. Students will also be introduced to blockchain attorneys and entrepreneurs in San Francisco, and will draft and present an analysis of a selected blockchain company.

LAW 743F
Privacy Litigation

2 Unit(s)

This course explores the roots of US privacy law and litigation, the evolution of the focus of litigation since the 1970s, and the current challenges of companies and the courts in the modern era where new privacy laws are being discussed, proposed, and enacted at the state and federal level, as well as around the globe. We will explore a range of approaches to litigation and enforcement actions in response to companies' handling of personal information and data breaches, evaluating their main themes, effectiveness, consistency, and practicability.

LAW 743G
Tech Start-Up Lawyering

1 Unit(s)

Focusing on the questions that confront in-house lawyers at tech start-ups on a daily basis, this class equips students with the analytical tools to quickly get up to speed on new subjects, issue spot, and present business-oriented solutions. The purpose of the course is to emphasize business-minded legal judgment and convey practical lessons that are transferable to most in-house legal work. Coursework is simulation-based with an emphasis on legal analysis, contract interpretation, and business writing. Students work through common issues from the moment an in-house lawyer learns of a problem to the development, communication, and implementation of a solution tailored to a start-up's risk appetite.

LAW 746
Certified Information Privacy Professional for the US Prep Course

1 Unit(s)

This course will prepare students to take and pass the Certified Information Privacy Professional for the United States (CIPP/US) exam offered by the International Association of Privacy Professional (IAPP). Students must independently register for the CIPP/US exam. More information will be disseminated on the first day of class.

LAW 747
Advertising Law

3 Unit(s)

This course will cover legislative and judicial, federal and state, advertising law in the US -currently and historically. Special focus will be made regarding recent and ongoing efforts to regulate advertising - both commercial and political-in the internet age. Constitutional considerations will be explored.

LAW 748
Policing and Use of Force in America

2 Unit(s)

A series of deadly police use-of-force incidents has stirred the national consciousness and created widespread calls for police reform. This course will examine the various legal responses and remedies to these incidents, including criminal prosecution, civil litigation, administrative processes, and policy changes. Because this course will delve deeply into seizures under the Fourth Amendment, qualified immunity, and state policing standards, it is recommended that students have completed Criminal Procedure. Video evidence plays an important role in these incidents and lawyers cannot meaningfully analyze cases without weighing this and other evidence against the appropriate legal or administrative standards. Accordingly, students who enroll in this course will have to view and analyze video evidence as a prosecutor, civil rights lawyer, or defense attorney would in practice. Although these videos can be disturbing, they are often central to the outcomes of cases, so students should be prepared to analyze this evidence. The course will be taught by a leading expert in investigating police conduct who has advised agencies nationally and internationally and has a background in civil rights prosecution, investigation, and public defense. Recommended Prerequisite: LAW 803E Criminal Procedure.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 760
Intro to French & European Union Law

1 Unit(s)

This introduction to French and European Union Law has 2 main goals. First, to provide a solid foundation for understanding both the French legal system, which relies on statute law and codes as its primary source of law, and the unique European legal system, which relies on treaty law as its primary source of law and on regulations and directives. The second goal of the course is to make a close study of key legal terminology in order to avoid some of the most common misunderstandings that arise between French and American lawyers. During the 2-week course, students will have opportunities to visit French courts; interact with a number of French, European, and American lawyers; and take a field trip to Brussels, where they will hear lectures by members of the European Commission or its staff. There is no prerequisite for this course. This course is offered only through the Paris Summer Program.

LAW 761A
Comparative Criminal Procedure

2 Unit(s)

This course explores contemporary legal controversies related to criminal law, criminal procedure and the criminal justice systems of multiple countries.. The course provides an overview of the differing approaches and highlight modern controversies with a special focus on the law of the United States, France, and the European Union. This course is taught in Paris, France and is open to JD, LLM, and SJD students enrolled in the GGU Paris Program only.

LAW 762A
Comparative Sex and Gender Law

2 Unit(s)

This course explores contemporary legal controversies related to sex, gender, and sexuality. The course explores human rights law, with a special focus on American, French, and European approaches to equality and the protection of fundamental rights. This course is taught in Paris France and is open to JD, LLM, and SJD students enrolled in the GGU Paris Program only.

LAW 763A
Comparative Issues in Corprorate Law

2 Unit(s)

This course explores contemporary issues in corporate law and governance in the European Union, France, the United States, and other jurisdictions. Topics include the purposes, mechanisms, and challenges of the corporate form as well as common issues confronted by foreign and trans-national lawyers in practice. This course is offered only through the Paris Summer Program.

LAW 765A
Comparative Employment Law

2 Unit(s)

This course explores contemporary legal controversies related to employment, labor, and the workplace. The course provides an overview of the differing approaches and highlight modern controversies with a special focus on the law of the United States, France, and the European Union. This course is taught in Paris, France and is open to JD, LLM, and SJD students enrolled in the GGU Paris Program only.

LAW 776C
Veterans Legal Advocacy Clinic

24 Unit(s)

Students in this multi-disciplinary on campus program will learn and practice veterans disability law and procedure and represent actual clients before the Department of Veterans Affairs. Under attorney supervision, students will engage in client interviews, attorney-client communications and relationship, evidence gathering, factual investigation, legal research, case strategy, and objective and persuasive legal writing. Students will gain practical experience in veterans and administrative law. Through direct client services, students are exposed to many issues facing indigent clients beyond their interactions with the military. Students are expected to be thoroughly prepared and zealously represent their client. After completion of the course, students will have practiced and experienced many aspects of attorney-client representation, and the undertaking of a legal matter from its initial beginnings to completion. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Previous or concurrent enrollment in LAW 776D- Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar required.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 776D
Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar

2 Unit(s)

The Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar provides the skills necessary to understand the practice of law, and the theory of veterans' law. The course will supplement a student's legal education by teaching the practical skills necessary to succeed as an attorney in multiple legal areas, while working with real life situations and clients. The course will explore what it means to be an attorney while dealing with actual clients. It teaches students the skills necessary to undertake a legal matter from the initial client meeting to the completion of the case. Skills covered include: client interviewing, attorney-client communications and relationship, evidence gathering, factual investigation, legal research, case strategy, and objective and persuasive legal writing. In class, students will engage in discussions and potential solution to veterans' legal issues, and think critically about policy issues surrounding veterans' disability law and military discharge upgrades. After completion of the course, students will have sharpened their legal skills and obtained the confidence and ability to represent actual clients in a variety of legal settings.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 776L
Veterans Law & Policy Seminar

2 Unit(s)

Students will enhance their knowledge of legal issues confronting military veterans, service members and their families. Students will also enhance their research and writing skills through engaging in in-depth research on different topics and writing short pieces suitable for publication. Students will write on current or proposed policies or laws that impact service members, veterans or their families with the goal of providing clear explanations, describing the impact, and/or taking a position on the law or policy. Students will also develop their professional presentation skills through short classroom presentations. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course.

LAW 801A
Constitutional Law I

3 Unit(s)

Constitutional Law I examines the American constitutional system with an emphasis on judicial review, the powers and responsibilities of the three branches of the federal government, the distribution of power between federal and state governments, and substantive due process.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 801B
Constitutional Law II

3 Unit(s)

Constitutional Law II deals with individual rights, specifically equal protection of the law, freedom of speech, and religious freedom. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 801E
Legal Analysis

2 Unit(s)

Legal Analysis is an intensive skills-based course for first-year law students in their spring semester, designed to improve their academic skills in a small group setting with the one-on-one support of a skills professor. Specifically, the course focuses on the following essential skills for success: reading cases at a deep level, effective briefing, synthesizing course material down to a precise outline, using multiple choice strategies to get to the best answer choice, and engaging in a thorough analysis of the facts against the law. The course is hands-on; students are expected to turn in assignments regularly for feedback, and take timed and untimed practice exams. The course takes place in lieu of the first-year spring semester 1L Lawyering Elective and is graded on a credit/no credit basis. Enrollment in Legal Analysis requires approval from Academic Achievement and Student Affairs.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 801J
Sex, the Supreme Court, and the Constitution

2 Unit(s)

This course explores the legal development of American constitutional law related to sexual and reproductive activity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and sexuality generally. Over the course of the semester, each student will complete a presentation and paper on a course topic of their choosing with individual feedback from the instructor. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law 1. NOTE: This is a mixed mode, online course with approximately 7 required meetings during the scheduled time. Class meetings will occur live but remotely via video conference (you will need a computer or smart phone with a camera). Attendance at the synchronous, live courses is mandatory.

LAW 801M
First Amendment Free Exercise and Religious Conflicts

2 Unit(s)

This two-unit course will examine the major Free Exercise and Establishment Clause decisions of the United States Supreme Court (including Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission ) and related legislation (especially the Religious Freedom Restoration Act), with a focus on religious exemptions from anti-discrimination laws. Other topics explored include conscience provisions, funding of religion, religious activities on campus, and political activities of religious organizations. The course includes a realistic writing project that satisfies the Upper Division Writing Requirement expected of a junior attorney at an organization advising on a matter implicating free exercise of religion.

LAW 801N
The Second Amendment: Law, Policy, and Regulation

2 Unit(s)

Mass shootings over the past several years have elevated the issue of gun violence and regulation to the forefront of America's current political and legal discourse. In 2020, against the backdrop of a presidential election, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to decide the first major Second Amendment case in nearly a decade. This seminar, taught by a sitting superior court judge and former federal prosecutor, will conduct a deep dive into the Second Amendment, including its historical origins, Supreme Court jurisprudence, public policy discussions, and efforts at state and federal regulation.

LAW 802A
Business Associations

4 Unit(s)

This course covers the formation, financing, structure, control, and management of business associations, including corporations, partnerships, and limited liability entities. The course also examines agency principles and uniform acts related to business associations and selected provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 802B
Securities Regulation

3 Unit(s)

This course will provide an overview of United States federal securities laws as they relate to the issuance and trading of securities in US capital markets. In particular, we will review the broad arc of the securities laws as they have evolved from Great Depression/New Deal roots through the Boesky/Milken/greenmail scandals of the 1980's, the Enron/WorldCom crises of the 1990s and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. Students that prepare, attend and participate will learn how and why the securities laws (1) dictate the structure of many capital raising transactions (such as private venture capital financings and initial public offerings) and M&A events, (2) regulate trading in public markets such as the NYSE and Nasdaq, and (3) influence modern corporate governance, control and strategic planning. Pre- or Co-requisite: Business Associations.

LAW 802J
Corporate Compliance & Ethics

3 Unit(s)

The number and scope of ethical lapses in American corporations continue to escalate, record breaking fines are on the rise, and the desire to prosecute individual employees for corporate misdeeds remains. This course will prepare Finance and Law students to: 1) navigate the complexity of complying with corporate law and regulations; 2) design, implement and maintain effective compliance risk and ethics programs; and 3) support business objectives, using the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines and legal ethics rules as our guides. The course will also introduce students to the common law method by which doctrine is created; the importance and authority of corporate statutes, business and ethics codes, and corporate regulations, and the structure of the U.S. legal system and its various actors and related impact to business models. This course will engage students through case methods to emphasize effective risk management techniques and how to establish and manage risk tolerances and performance measures. This course is invaluable to students who are considering a career in business, law or compliance or have positions in management that support Board of Director activities. Prerequisite: Business Associations

LAW 803A
Criminal Procedure I

3 Unit(s)

This survey of the basic constitutional issues underlying the criminal justice system focuses on the role of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments in regulating police practices such as search and seizure, confessions, lineups, and right to counsel.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 803B
Criminal Procedure II

3 Unit(s)

Topics include bail and other forms of pretrial release, prosecutorial discretion, the preliminary hearing, grand jury, joinder and severance, speedy trial, discovery, guilty pleas and plea bargaining, double jeopardy, pretrial publicity, change of venue, sentencing, appellate review and harmless error, and habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure I.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 804
Evidence

4 Unit(s)

This course is a survey of the principles of law and rules governing the admissibility of proof at criminal or civil trials, including direct and cross-examination of witnesses, impeachment of credibility, expert testimony, hearsay, privileged communication, and documentary proof. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I, Corequisite: Civil Procedure II

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 804C
Evidence in the Courtroom

2 Unit(s)

A two-unit course designed to help you master and properly utilize the California rules of evidence. Practical work will empower and propel victory at trial with both judge and jury. You will use the evidence code, brain cognition theory, hands-on practice, research, and experiential and spontaneous problem solving skills during actual trial situations to ensure that your story prevails. You will gain comfort, expertise and the expansive ability to improvise, adapt and overcome the unexpected events that occur during trial. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite: Evidence and Trial Advocacy.

LAW 804M
Effective Brief Writing & Motion Advocacy

2 Unit(s)

A judge's first impression of a lawyer is often based on the quality of his or her papers. That impression had better be a good one. This course, taught by a former prosecutor, will teach students how to effectively draft motions and argue them in a real-world setting. Utilizing a variety of fact patterns, students will develop a portfolio of written work and will receive feedback aimed at building confidence in courtroom advocacy.

LAW 804T
Trial Evidence and Advocacy

5 Unit(s)

Specifically-designed for the Summer Trial and Evidence Program (1st STEP), this course combines the courses of trial advocacy and evidence in the courtroom, as well as presentation and acting techniques from a theater instructor. In the trial advocacy part, students learn the basic skills needed by every lawyer going to court: conducting a direct examination of a witness, introducing documents and physical evidence, cross-examining witnesses, making and answering objections, and preparing opening statements and closing arguments. In the evidence in the courtroom part, students learn that the rules of evidence dictate the manner of criminal and civil trials. Students will learn how arguments under the rules of evidence and evidentiary rulings play out in the courtroom. This course connects the rules of evidence and evidentiary determinations with the skills of trial advocacy. The final examination for this course is a full trial. Corequisite (within 1st STEP): Evidence. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

LAW 805
Professional Responsibility

2 Unit(s)

This course examines the attorney's responsibility to the client, the profession, and society, as well as the structure and operation of the U.S. legal profession. Both ABA and California rules are discussed.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 805P
Practice Ready Seminar

2 Unit(s)

In addition to oral advocacy, legal research and writing, and critical thinking, there are a host of other concepts and skills that are an essential part of preparing for both your first year of practice as well as how you'll approach the rest of your career. At the heart of successfully transitioning from a law student to practicing attorney is a clear understanding of your motivations, what you want from your career, and how to create action plans that will ensure you achieve your professional goals. This course is designed to equip you with the mindset, strategies, and practical tools you need to approach your career with confidence and show up at your first position ready to practice.

LAW 806
Remedies

3 Unit(s)

This survey of the legal and equitable remedies available to litigants based on their substantive rights emphasizes the type and extent of damages awarded in different legal settings. Also covered are specific performance, injunctive relief, and restitutionary remedies. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I, Constitutional Law II, and Property.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 806S
Strategic Jury Persuasion

1 Unit(s)

Persuasive storytelling is key to becoming a winning trial lawyer. This advanced "how to" course is for students who want a deeper dive into the science and art of jury storytelling and persuasion. Students will be introduced to the trial preparation techniques of some of the most successful trial lawyers in the country. Topics will include how to let your story do the arguing for you, how to successfully use focus groups, how to combat cognitive biases of jurors, and how to become more persuasive through proper framing, among others. Utilizing interactive strategies, students will practice and hone their courtroom persuasion skills. Class size will be limited. Prerequisite: Trial Advocacy or STEP or permission of the professor.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 807
Wills and Trusts

3 Unit(s)

A study of nontax estate planning devices, this course explores intestate succession; restrictions on the power to dispose of property; the execution and revocation of wills; and the nature, creation, modification, and termination of trusts. Future interests and perpetuities problems are also discussed. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite: Property.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 808A
Community Property

2 Unit(s)

This course covers the law of California marital property. Topics include general principles of classifying marital property, management and control of community property, division of community property upon dissolution or death, and the property rights of putative or meretricious spouses. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite: Property.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 809B
HLP Client Representation

2 Unit(s)

This course applies the law of Evidence and Constitutional Law II to practical problems. This course is open only to students in the Honors Lawyering Program (HLP). Corequisite: Evidence.

LAW 811
Administrative Law

2 Unit(s)

This course surveys the organization, authority, and procedures of administrative agencies in relation to rulemaking, adjudication, and judicial review of administrative rulings and decisions. The course examines both federal and state agencies.

LAW 815
Alternative Dispute Resolution

3 Unit(s)

The purpose of this course is to help students learn approaches to negotiation and conflict resolution, and to understand various dispute resolution processes, principally mediation and arbitration. Students will be exposed to simulated negotiations and mediations and will be expected to participate in exercises and to act as advocates and/or mediators. Guest lecturers may include a hostage negotiator, an aikido master, a retired superior court judge now serving as a JAMS mediator, and prominent mediators and arbitrators. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I and II.

LAW 816A
Accounting for Lawyers

2 Unit(s)

This introductory course gives students a basic understanding of the structure of an accounting system; the mechanics of accounting entries; and the related legal, tax and business ramifications of implementing various accounting conventions and methods. Course lectures and text include discussions and cases covering generally accepted accounting principles, financial statement analysis and disclosure, auditing, choice of entity issues, and the attorney's role in dealing with accountants, auditors, and other financial professionals.

LAW 817B
Introduction to Islamic Law

2 Unit(s)

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of Islamic law and their applicability in contemporary legal systems. Throughout the course students will learn the history and evolution of Islamic law, development of different schools of thought, an overview of the substantive principles and comparative analyses with existing legal principles in the world. Students will also have an opportunity to explore Islamic legal systems in diverse communities, the impact of colonialism and modernity on Islamic law, and to examine the presence of Islam in today's western societies. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 819
Legal Technology & Innovation

2 Unit(s)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the impact Legal Operations and Technology have on the practice of law. As law firms and corporate legal departments shift their focus to running legal like a business, how do Operations and Technology impact the delivery and value of legal services? This highly-interactive and unique course will prepare students for the new realities of legal practice and the impact legal technology has had (and will have) on legal roles. The course will include live demonstrations of core legal software, guest speakers, and technical exercises.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 819E
Introduction to eDiscovery

1 Unit(s)

In this class you will explore the tools, common practices and laws that make eDiscovery unique. In doing so, you will learn to manage the risks associated with identification, preservation, collection, review and production of electronically stored information (ESI). ESI comprises approximately 90%+ of documents produced in a litigation (e.g. emails, network databases, Word, Excel, social media and cellular data), and ESI significantly increases in volume and complexity with each passing year. Leave this course with an understanding of how to best serve your future clients while meeting your discovery obligations under Federal and California law.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 819W
Introduction to Written Discovery

1 Unit(s)

Learn the secrets, shortcuts and pitfalls from an experienced litigator. Gain hands-on experience and outsmart your opponents while avoiding discovery sanctions. You will practice draft and defend written discovery.

LAW 822A
Animal Law

2 Unit(s)

This course will introduce students to the status of animals in our legal system, substantive laws relating to animals, the use of litigation as a tool to enforce those laws. Through readings, case studies, and skills-based learning, students will gain an understanding of key elements of animal law litigation, such as standing, causes of action, and case development and strategy.

LAW 823
Copyright Law of the U.S.

3 Unit(s)

This in-depth analysis of U.S. copyright law includes the history of the law, from the first copyright statutes through the major revisions of the 1909 Act, the 1976 Act, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998. Students explore legal issues relating to the registration process, defenses such as fair use and parody, and remedies for infringement. Terms for the licensing and/or transfer of copyright are also examined. Includes the impact of the use of digital media and the growth of the Internet on copyright protection. Intellectual Property LLM students are required to take this course, Trademark Law of the U.S., or Patent Law of the U.S.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 823D
Intellectual Property Litigation: Copyright and Trademark

2 Unit(s)

This course takes students through the various stages of an intellectual property litigation case, focusing on the issues specific to litigating trademark cases and copyright cases. Infringement and breach of contract situations form the basis for study and analysis. Litigation strategies, discovery techniques, and settlement negotiation issues are also addressed. This course counts toward completion of the JD Upper Division Writing Requirement.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 823E
Intellectual Property Law Survey

3 Unit(s)

An introduction to the U.S. law of copyright, trademark, and patent, this course explores state law of trade secrets, unfair competition, and the role of IP protection of computer programs. The course is designed for students interested in focusing on IP law or in simply getting a basic understanding of the key legal principles of IP law.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 823G
IP Practicum: Patent Law

2 Unit(s)

This course focuses on the primary legal and procedural requirements for preparing and prosecuting patent applications under federal law. The course is designed to introduce students to the main legal doctrines of the patent preparation and prosecution practice, as well as the strategic considerations underlying the lawyering process in this area of intellectual property law. A core component of this course is the use of simulations that require students to complete both written and oral assignments that emulate actual legal practice in patent preparation and prosecution, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Students will receive extensive feedback on assignments in order to enhance active learning of legal skills, legal writing skills, and professional development. Among the assignments, students may practice drafting patent applications, responding to office actions, performing patentability searches, and preparing client letters. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 823P
IP Practicum: Trademark & Copyright Transactions

2 Unit(s)

This course focuses on the primary legal and procedural requirements for registering, maintaining, exploiting, and enforcing trademarks and copyrights under federal law. The course is designed to introduce students to the main legal doctrines of trademark and copyright transactional practice, as well as the strategic considerations underlying the lawyering process in these areas of intellectual property law. A core component of this course is the use of simulations that require students to complete both written and oral assignments that emulate actual legal practice in trademark and copyright prosecution, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the U.S. Copyright Office. Students will receive extensive feedback on assignments in order to enhance active learning of legal skills, legal writing skills, and professional development. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 823S
Privacy Law Practicum

2 Unit(s)

Students will identify privacy issues/risks in technology, identify technology solutions to privacy problems, recommend privacy features and communicate them accurately. Students will learn about mitigating privacy risks, and perform the kind of work that privacy practitioners in the technology sector perform.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 823T
Trade Secrets Law

2 Unit(s)

This course will provide students with an introduction to a specific discipline of Intellectual Property Law that has experienced spectacular growth with the advances in digital technology and the proliferation of technological entrepreneurism. The course will provide students with an understanding of what trade secrets are and why they are crucial to a business enterprise. Students will gain some practical experience in how trade secrets are protected and managed in order to facilitate their understanding of the concept of misappropriation of trade secrets. Finally, the course will allow students to become familiar with trade secret litigation (tactics and defenses), remedies for misappropriation of trade secrets, and the criminal consequences of trade secret misappropriation. The course will use a problem/case-study approach in dealing with the basics of trade secret law and the legal issues arising from the misappropriation of trade secrets. This course stresses the practical aspects of trade secret law by giving students the opportunity to produce meaningful deliverables in the same manner as they would as a junior associate in a law firm. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

LAW 823U
Privacy Law Practicum II

2 Unit(s)

Students will learn updates to privacy laws and gain knowledge of privacy practice in the law firm and in-house context. Students will learn to identify privacy issues, identify solutions to privacy problems, recommend privacy features, communicate them accurately, and assess privacy risks posed by privacy terms, specific technologies, their features, and related agreements. Students in this course will do hands-on exercises -to learn the kind of work that privacy practitioners in the technology sector perform.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 825H
Habeas Corpus and the Death Penalty

2 Unit(s)

The writ of Habeas Corpus, the so-called Great Writ, is a collateral attack on a criminal conviction, which unlike an appeal, which it functionally resembles, is based on facts outside the record on appeal. The classic habeas corpus claim is ineffective assistance of counsel, which requires the petitioner to both show that trial counsel failed to adequately perform in a case and to show what trial counsel could have done that would have made a difference, particularly in the area of presenting evidence that was not presented at trial. Habeas Corpus petitions play an important role in death penalty litigation, where every aspect of a case is scrutinized and challenged, given the ultimate penalty involved. In this course, we will read important state and federal habeas corpus decisions, as well as portions of actual habeas corpus petitions to understand both the theory and practice of state and federal habeas corpus. Topics will include: differences between direct appeal and habeas corpus; major habeas corpus claims, including ineffective assistance of counsel; peculiarities of death penalty habeas corpus; and the relationship between state and federal habeas corpus petitions and federal exhaustion requirements.

LAW 826R
Business Bankruptcy

3 Unit(s)

This course examines the rights and remedies available to a failing business and its creditors when the business seeks to reorganize under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code. The course is structured as a "practicum," which tracks a single business through restructuring, and emphasizes practical and strategic lawyering skills. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 827B
Venture Capital Business Transactions

3 Unit(s)

Using the venture capital financing of a start-up company as a transactional model, this class focuses on the practical mechanics of how a business transaction is structured and implemented from term sheet to closing. The purpose of the course is to convey practical lessons that are transferable to any business transaction. Coursework covers the documentation, legal issues, business issues, and mechanical process of closing a preferred stock financing on behalf of a venture-backed start up. Previous or concurrent enrollment in Business Associations is required; Recommended: prior securities law class advisable but not required. This course counts toward the Certificates of Specialization for both Business Law and Intellectual Property Law.

LAW 827C
Venture Capital

3 Unit(s)

Using the venture capital financing of a start-up company as a transactional model, this class focuses on the practical mechanics of how a business transaction is structured and implemented from term sheet to closing. The purpose of the course is to convey practical lessons that are transferable to any business transaction. Coursework covers the documentation, legal issues, business issues, and mechanical process of closing a preferred stock financing on behalf of a venture-backed start up. Previous or concurrent enrollment in Business Associations is required; Recommended: prior securities law class advisable but not required. This course counts toward the Certificates of Specialization for both Business Law and Intellectual Property Law.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 829A
Poverty Law

2 Unit(s)

The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the unique legal issues of the poor and how the legal system deals with access to justice and indigency. We will review historical and contemporary challenges facing public interest lawyers, legal problems and policy choices regarding poverty, and effective advocacy strategies. These themes will then be traced through three areas of substantive discussion: government benefit programs, housing law and homelessness, and family law. We will conclude the course with an examination of new trends in legal services. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 831
Employment Law

3 Unit(s)

This course examines the relationship between employers and individual employees. Topics include hiring, wrongful termination, employees' duty of loyalty, restrictions on post-employment competition, workplace privacy and defamation, and protection against harassment and other abusive conduct in the workplace. The course covers substantive law and examines prevailing assumptions about the employment relationship. While the course covers some discrimination issues, it does not offer in-depth coverage of that area of law.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 833
Entertainment Law

3 Unit(s)

An introduction to the complex legal issues arising in the areas of music sound recordings and publishing, motion pictures, television, theater, and literary publishing in the United States and internationally. Covers the drafting of contracts in the entertainment industry, as well as dispute resolution alternatives. Students also study the roles of attorneys, agents and personal managers, as well as relevant legislation affecting the entertainment industry.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 833D
Negotiating and Drafting Contracts in the Entertainment Business

2 Unit(s)

This advanced course in entertainment law focuses on the drafting and negotiation of the numerous agreements involved in entertainment projects. Sound recording and publishing contracts in the music business and licensing agreements for the online distribution of music and audiovisual works are examined in detail. Students get hands-on experience in drafting these agreements. They also analyze negotiation points and discuss negotiation tips and strategies with experienced practitioners in entertainment law.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 834C
Environmental Law & Justice Clinic

23 Unit(s)

The Environmental Law & Justice Clinic (ELJC) is an in-house clinic, which provides students with intensive training and hands-on lawyering experience. Under close faculty supervision, students provide legal representation on matters addressing environmental justice, including enforcement of environmental laws and formulating energy justice policies. Clinic students are certified under State Bar of California rules to perform many of the tasks of an attorney: they interview clients, develop legal strategies, draft legal documents, and counsel clients. They may also appear at hearings and negotiate with opposing parties. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Corequisite: Evidence. Special scheduling arrangements can be made on a case-by-case basis for night students.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 834F
Federal Environmental Law & Policy

3 Unit(s)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Environmental Law, including the federal Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Climate Change, the Endangered Species Act, Citizen Suits, Criminal Prosecution and the National Environmental Policy Act. Students explore federal regulatory strategies, including environmental justice, technology-based requirements, and enforcement methods, as well as alternatives to traditional regulation such as market-based mechanisms. Students also learn tools of statutory interpretation and other skills using PIC exercises and the problem method.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 834G
Environmental Law & Justice Seminar

2 Unit(s)

The ENVIRONMENTAL LAW & JUSTICE SEMINAR explores law and policy issues central to the environmental justice movement, focusing on matters that recur in the Clinic's representation of clients who are disproportionately impacted by pollution; explores the role of lawyers and their ethical responsibility in representing clients from communities overburdened by pollution; and provides skills training that students must master to become effective lawyers, focusing on skills that are necessary for the Clinic's caseload. The seminar is a required companion course to the Environmental Law & Justice Clinic, but it may also be taken by LLM students who are not enrolling in the Clinic with permission of the instructor. Such permission may be denied if the Clinic's caseload is unsuitable for such an arrangement. Co-requisite: Environmental Law & Justice Clinic.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 834H
California Environmental and Land Use Law

3 Unit(s)

This course focuses on California constitutional provisions, California statutes and California court decisions that pertain to environmental protection, natural resources and land use regulation. Topics covered include the California Environmental Quality Act, California Coastal Act, California Forest Practices Act, California Endangered Species Act, San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC), public trust law, surface water rights, California's Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), California planning and zoning law, conditional use permits and variances, regulatory takings claims related to land use restrictions, and the use of specialized mandamus lawsuits in California to challenge the decisions of local and state environmental/land use agencies. A significant portion of the grade for this course involves analysis of the Complaint and trial court briefs in an environmental lawsuit challenging portions of the California High Speed Rail project.

LAW 837A
Family Law

3 Unit(s)

This analysis of public and private regulation of the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of the de facto and de jure family unit includes the respective custody, support, and property rights and obligations between mates and between parents and children. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. Prerequisite: Property.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 837D
Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault In Criminal Law Practice

2 Unit(s)

The most challenging cases for both prosecutors and defense attorneys are special victim cases involving allegations of domestic violence and/or sexual assault. The incidents underlying these cases typically occur in private in a domestic environment often laden with complicated and dysfunctional dynamics. The presentation of these sensitive cases in public court proceedings creates numerous pitfalls for even the most experienced practitioners as all parties struggle to balance the defendant's rights against the victim's rights, often with no clear way of reconciliation. This course will examine these types of cases from start to finish, including investigation, the filing of criminal charges, trial, and sentencing, as well as the complex social issues and public interest surrounding these cases. Students will learn both the practical skills for handling these cases and consider the deeper implications regarding how such cases are handled in today's criminal justice system. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 837E
Domestic Violence Seminar

2 Unit(s)

This seminar studies the historical, cultural, and psychological aspects of domestic violence in addition to the civil and criminal changes in the law both nationally and internationally. Students are assigned a reader composed of relevant articles, cases, and legislation.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 837F
Family Law Practice

2 Unit(s)

This course focuses on the skills necessary to carry on a basic family law practice in California. Students prepare and argue motions, learn trial skills, and practice using the most popular computer programs for setting child support according to the detailed provisions of the Family Code. Students also develop parenting and child visitation plans, calculate spousal support, and learn various methods of dividing community property. Priority is given to graduating students. Prior completion of Family Law and Community Property is recommended, but not required, and may also be taken concurrently. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

LAW 838
Youth and Justice Law Seminar

2 Unit(s)

For over a century this country has wrestled with how to treat youth in the juvenile justice system and many have questioned its effectiveness. This struggle centers on the tension between recognizing youth as developmentally distinct from adults, thus deserving of second chances and rehabilitative services, and historically and culturally driven notions of accountability, justice, and safety. This course will explore this tension and examine how that internal struggle has shaped the building of the juvenile justice system as a separate legal institution governed by unique criminal law, procedure, and policy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of juvenile justice from both policy and legal perspectives through analyzing case decisions, social science research, legal theory, and empirical studies. During this course the class will probe questions such as: What does juvenile justice look like? How does the social construction of adolescence impact legal definitions? What role do the advances in science on brain development play in the administration of juvenile justice? How has race, gender, sexuality, gender identity, immigration status, and class impacted juvenile courts' jurisprudence? What factors have influenced the court's ever shifting understanding of culpability by age? Where are the overlaps and intersections between the juvenile justice and adult criminal justice systems? This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 838B
Federal Income Taxation

2 Unit(s)

This course examines the fundamental concepts of federal income taxation, including gross income, business and investment deductions, personal exemptions, and the mechanics of capital transactions.

LAW 842
Immigration and Social Justice

2 Unit(s)

This course takes the complexity of asylum law practice with intentional field experience in advocacy to teach students how to draft an asylum brief for immigration court. This course will also teach the basics of court appearances and legal argumentation for real-world practice. Students will learn how to use the theory of Rebellious Lawyering in community advocacy for survivors of trauma and persecution, as well as receive feedback that will help to boost confidence in courtroom advocacy. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 842A
Immigration Law

3 Unit(s)

This introduction to immigration and naturalization law and procedure examines major immigration policies and covers immigration and naturalization statutes, regulations, major administrative and court decisions, and constitutional rights as affected by alienage. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.

LAW 842D
Immigration & Refugee Policy Seminar

3 Unit(s)

This course will focus on U.S. and national asylum law and procedure, international refugee protection law and procedure, and significant debates regarding these topics. Students will become familiar with the process involving USCIS, US ICE, Immigration Courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and the federal courts of review. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course.

LAW 842H
Constitutional Issues in Immigration Law

2 Unit(s)

This course examines issues in immigration law that raise constitutional questions. To do that we will study the historical evolution of United States immigration law, how it was shaped by xenophobia and has operated to exclude and marginalize non-white immigrants. Students will consider how judicial interpretations of immigration statutes and regulations have operated to enshrine and maintain systems of white supremacy and reflect on how effective legal advocacy requires challenges to the existing system as a whole. Specifically, this course will cover: the Court's use of the plenary power doctrine, state and local attempts to enact immigration policies and whether courts found them preempted by, our system of immigration detention (including when indefinite detention is constitutional), the doctrine of consular nonreviewability and the due process rights non-citizens have in removal proceedings and elsewhere in society. Over the course of the semester, students will write and present an academic paper on an immigration-related topic of their choosing. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 844
Introduction to Human Rights in the United States

2 Unit(s)

The primary learning objective of this course will be to understand human rights laws and mechanisms as they relate to critical human rights issues in the United States. Key human rights questions will be addressed, starting with "What are human rights?" and "Are they enforceable?" We will begin with the historical development of the UN human rights regime and role of the United States in creation of the founding legal documents such as the International Bill of Human Rights. We will examine two types of human rights-the traditional civil and political rights, along with economic and social rights with specific examples of right-based issues in the US, such as, cross-border migration, women's rights, poverty, and right to health. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 844C
Civil Rights Practice

2 Unit(s)

This class explores the practical and substantive aspects of using federal civil litigation to enact systemic change. The course will cover the nuts and bolts of "impact litigation," including a review of the substantive requirements of specific constitutional provisions and federal statutes as well as unique considerations that arise in such actions. Students will also learn how to analyze the viability of a particular legal action as applied to real-life situations. Finally, we will review the historical development of civil rights lawyering, including the work of lawyers that has led to seminal cases in our country's history and a discussion of the relationships between lawyers and social movements.

LAW 845
Reimagining Criminal Justice

2 Unit(s)

This course is an opportunity to explore, discuss, and write about recent proposals to reimagine criminal justice in the United States. We will consider the implications of these proposals and their potential for creating a more just system of criminal law and procedure by eliminating the significant discriminatory impact the system has had on underrepresented minorities and impoverished communities. Students will select a book on criminal justice to read, review, and present to the rest of the class. Students will draft two short opinion pieces (1,200 words) on proposed reforms of their choice. Students will also make 2-3 short formal presentations to the class. We will study the components of the recent House Bill entitled "Justice in Policing Act of 2020." We will also discuss possible federal and state reforms that address decisions by the US Supreme Court in the area of criminal law and criminal procedure that have contributed to an unfair system of justice. This course will not have a final exam.

LAW 845D
Unseen Hand of Insurance in the Law

2 Unit(s)

A basic understanding of insurance is essential to effective civil practice. Whether we practice as solo lawyers, in law firms, in nonprofits, or in non-law businesses, and for plaintiffs or defendants, the safety net of insurance is essential to our daily work, how we get business, and what we earn. In this interactive, two-unit elective course, presented in a pragmatic and social-policy oriented context. There will be writing and oral advocacy assignments, diverse guest speakers presenting differing views, from law firms and businesses looking to hire new attorneys.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 846
International Human Rights Law Through Film

2 Unit(s)

This course provides an introduction to some of the most challenging human rights issues in different countries and the crucial role of democracy in protecting human rights. Throughout the semester, we will examine challenges to the enjoyment of traditional civil and political rights, along with economic and social rights in the United States, Hong Kong, India, and Tunisia that are depicted via the cinematic medium. The substantive human rights content of the film will be analyzed through a combination of lecture, textbook reading, PowerPoint, and group discussion. Topics include the history of human rights regime, human rights laws and mechanisms, categories of human rights, and State responsibilities to protect human rights. Students will be asked to critically examine the factual information depicted in each movie, conduct individual research about each country, and identify specific human rights violations that are right-based. They will continue to apply human rights laws and mechanisms in their legal analysis for each human rights violation.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 846F
European Union Law

2 Unit(s)

The European Law course focuses primarily on the law of the European Union (EU), and aims to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to navigate this multilevel legal landscape. The course is oriented more towards acquiring practical understanding of how the EU works and learning how to research EU law, than towards developing comprehensive expertise in particular areas of EU law. As such, it is less a survey course than it is a course designed to convey a systematic working understanding of a complex legal system. These goals notwithstanding, we will read treaties, statutory law, and cases, and engage in close study of foundational (constitutional) legal principles and of the EU's legal and institutional architecture. Students will also become familiar with a wide variety of substantive and procedural laws - such as those governing market relations (e.g., domestic and foreign trade, consumer protection, product liability, antitrust law), rights (including the relationship between the EU and international human rights law, as embodied by the European Convention on Human Rights), civil (private) law and litigation, criminal justice, intellectual property law and 'Digital Europe', and family law - but these are selected more for what they teach about the operation of the European legal system than for their inherent interest. We will draw comparisons between the EU and the USA in order to highlight key similarities and differences, and delve into some larger European debates, such as those on the role of international law, the rule of law, the 'Area of Freedom, Security and Justice', and Brexit. Research exercises will provide students with opportunities to develop expertise regarding one or more areas of their particular interest.

LAW 849
International Human Rights Seminar

3 Unit(s)

This course begins with a brief historical introduction to the concept of international human rights and their antecedents. Selected international human rights instruments, including U.N. documents, regional instruments, U.S. reservations, U.S. legislation, and war crimes documents, are then examined in detail with appropriate classifications of human rights in accordance with their contents or substance and the chronological and generational stages of their development.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 851A
Children & the Law

2 Unit(s)

Children and the Law is a seminar that examines the unique status of children under our legal system, and explores the fundamental question of how the law allocates decision-making power and responsibility for children among the child, the family and the State. The course will focus on both the theory underpinning the child welfare and delinquency systems as well as the function of those systems in practice. Topics we cover include delinquency and juvenile justice; abuse and neglect; foster care and adoption; and the rights of children within the family. Unlike a course in family law, we will not focus on marriage, divorce, or reproductive rights. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 855
Professional Presentation & Persuasion

2 Unit(s)

Whether in the courtroom, working with colleagues, or spending time with clients, as a lawyer you must be able to communicate and present your ideas in a compelling manner that moves others to actions. In this class we will develop your presentation skills and give you strategies that will make you more confident and persuasive. You will learn and deliver various styles of presentation, learn specific techniques to deliver presentations without rote memorization, and become an engaging storyteller. Come prepared to eliminate nervous tics and self-consciousness when speaking in public, learn to think on your feet, and capture the attention of all your listeners. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 855A
Advanced Persuasion

1 Unit(s)

Persuasive communication is fundamental to your success as a practicing lawyer. You may be right that your client is innocent, but he or she will still go to prison unless you can persuade others - lawyers, judges, jurors - that you are right. Drawing on other disciplines, this course will help students develop a thoughtful approach to effective written and oral persuasion. Topics will include cognitive science, storytelling, and visual communication, among others. Students will be required to start this course with a completed writing project, rewrite it, and make an oral presentation involving the same subject matter. This course will feature interactive lectures, exercises, and group feedback.

LAW 855C
Advanced Communication for Attorneys

2 Unit(s)

Successful attorneys are skilled communicators inside and outside of the courtroom. This course will equip students with effective communication techniques to achieve desired results in real-life situations, such as speaking with partners or work staff, handling difficult work conversations, delivering presentations, client interactions, and more. Students will learn how to assess each scenario and be able to identify the best method to communicate their message with authenticity and confidence. Our focus will include vocal variation, purposeful movement, effective use of technology to enhance in-person and online presence, and other media. This course is graded Credit/No Credit.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 857A
Energy & Climate Law

3 Unit(s)

This course surveys the law and regulation of energy production, distribution, and use, with an emphasis on the legal and policy issues at the intersection of energy and environmental law. These issues are examined in the context of the electricity and natural gas industries, giving particular attention to the statutory and administrative framework governing public utilities and the wholesale and retail energy markets. The class provides an introduction to state and national energy policy, and compares local, regional, and global impacts of fossil-based and renewable energy sources on climate change and the natural environment. Students interested in environmental law, natural resources law, water law, administrative law, and international law should consider this course.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 858D
Business of Solo & Small Firm Law Practice

1 Unit(s)

Many GGU law graduates enter civil practice in small firms or in solo practice. To be competent practitioners they must not only master the substantive and procedural aspects of law practice, they must also master the skills needed to own and operate a small law practice business. This one-unit course, offered all day on three consecutive Saturdays, aims to help develop those business administrative skills. Subjects covered will include: choosing a location; choosing technology for phones, networking, calendaring; insurance; client relations; hiring and staff relations; marketing; relations with other firms and attorneys; and file management. A take-home final exam will be given at the end of the course, which will present students with an opportunity to demonstrate understanding of the course materials through their application to a hypothetical law firm start-up scenario.

LAW 861A
Law Review Writer

12 Unit(s)

Required of all Law Review members during their first year on Law Review (2 units/Fall, 1 unit/Spring). Over the course of the two semesters, each student will write a scholarly casenote or comment. During the Fall semester, 12 hours of mandatory seminar sessions will be scheduled. The total of 3 credits will be awarded at the end of the Spring term. Enrollment is limited to persons invited to join the Law Review. Membership on Law Review is determined in two ways: by first-year grades (top 10%) or through a writing competition that is held during the middle of the second semester of the first-year. Subject to certification, this course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 861C
Law Review Associate Editor

12 Unit(s)

Required of all Law Review members during their second year on Law Review (2 units/Fall, 1 unit/Spring). (Not applicable to Law Review Board members, see LAW 861D). In the Fall term, 12 hours of mandatory seminar sessions will be scheduled. During the course of the two semesters, each member will edit and cite check the work of various first year Law Review members or work on selected articles from outside authors. The total of 3 credits will be awarded at the end of the Spring term. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 861D
Law Review Board

12 Unit(s)

Required of all Law Review Board members during the Fall and Spring terms. Outlines of the requisite responsibilities of the board members are found in the Law Review Bylaws. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 862A
Environmental Law Journal Writer I

1 Unit(s)

Subject to certification, this course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 862B
Environmental Law Journal Writer II

1 Unit(s)

This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 862C
Environmental Law Journal Assoc. Editor

12 Unit(s)

This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 862D
Environmental Law Journal Edit. Board

12 Unit(s)

This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 863
Practical Legal Writing

2 Unit(s)

Starting bar review preparation early with a targeted purpose and approach is essential for exam success. Practical Legal Writing (PLW) is the first of two bar preparation classes students are encouraged to take in their final year of law school. In this course, through an introduction to the Performance Test section of the California Bar Exam, students will begin to develop the analytical and writing skills needed for success on the bar exam as a whole. Students will learn how to organize and write the various documents frequently tested via weekly simulation and review. Individual feedback is provided at several points in the semester to ensure progress and improvement. In addition to PLW, students are encouraged to take Early Bar Preparation (EBP) in their final semester for an in-depth substantive review of the most tested topics of the seven MBE subjects with an emphasis on essays and multiple choice questions. Students who have taken both PLW and EBP will be familiar with each component of the bar exam and enter their winter or summer bar review equipped with the framework and skills necessary to ensure a productive study period.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 863C
Legal Methods

2 Unit(s)

Legal Methods is an intensive second-year, fall semester skills-based course designed to build upon the academic skills learned in the first year. The course utilizes material students are currently learning in their second-year required courses, such as Constitutional Law I, to hone their ability to read deeply, synthesize effectively, and engage in thorough analysis. Additionally, students routinely practice the skill of self-assessment, thereby developing the ability to move their own learning forward. The course is hands-on; students are expected to turn in assignments regularly for feedback, and take timed and untimed practice exams. Most students who take Legal Methods see improvement in their GPA at the end of the semester. The course is graded on a credit/no credit basis. Enrollment in Legal Methods requires approval from Academic Achievement and Student Affairs.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 863E
Early Bar Prep

2 Unit(s)

In this course, students begin bar preparation early in their last semester of law school. Early Bar Preparation will be a review of the most tested topics of all seven MBE subjects (Civil Procedure, Contracts, Real Property, Evidence, Criminal Law and Procedure, Torts, and Constitutional Law). Students will learn and understand the components that make up the bar exam (essay, MBE and PT) and develop successful approaches to studying for the bar exam. Upon completion of Early Bar Preparation, students will have an in-depth review of the major topics within the seven subjects covered on the MBE, and therefore reduce the time needed to review these subjects during their post-graduation bar preparation period. The course will include instruction on both MBE and essay writing approaches and techniques.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 864A
Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice Review Writer

2 Unit(s)

Mandatory to all Journal members who do not sit on the Board during their second year and beyond to take courses. Over the course of the semester, each student will write a minimum of three case summaries and two blog posts. LLM/SJD students may either write the same number of case summaries as law students or petition to write a longer academic article, case note, or comment. In either case, LLM/SJD students must also write a minimum of one blog post. During the Spring semester, 12 hours of mandatory seminar sessions will be scheduled . Enrollment is limited to persons invited to join the Journal. Membership on the Journal is determined in two ways: via grades or through a writing competition. Subject to certification, this course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 864B
Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice Review Associate Editor

2 Unit(s)

Mandatory to all Journal members who do not sit on the Board during their second year and beyond to take courses. Required is 12 hours of mandatory seminar sessions will be scheduled. During the course of the semesters, each member will edit and cite check the work of various first year Journal members or work on selected articles from outside authors. Additionally, Associate Editors are required to author one blog post over the course of the semester. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 864C
Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice Review Board

2 Unit(s)

Mandatory to all Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Social Justice Review Board members during the Fall and Spring terms. Outlines of the requisite responsibilities of the board members are found in the Journal's Bylaws. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 865
Pandemic and Unrest: Emerging Legal Issues and Re-Imagining the Future

2 Unit(s)

The outbreak of COVID-19 has fundamentally disrupted life as we know it, creating unprecedented legal, ethical, and policy challenges across the globe. In the United States, the pandemic has exacerbated the underlying social, economic, and political inequalities that define life for so many Americans, calling into question the rules we play by and forcing institutions and companies to grapple with challenging issues in governance and business. Legal and policy responses to COVID-19 and its aftermath have created openings to forge new alliances between movements, find intersections among legal issues, and opportunities for lawyers to be thought leaders. By examining specific issues that a range of communities and businesses are facing, students will reflect on this moment in history, gain a framework for how to address emerging legal issues, learn and apply relevant legal doctrines in a variety of settings, and re-imagine the future. Utilizing a co-teaching model with the school's clinical and doctrinal faculty across disciplines, and industry experts in privacy, technology, intellectual property, employment, child welfare, criminal justice, and juvenile law, students will gain a practice-ready lens to the legal issues raised in the course.

LAW 865P
Legislation & Public Policy

2 Unit(s)

This course will help students to build capacity to do advocacy and policy-related work. Students will learn to draft legislation and do what it takes to get it passed. The course will provide students with advocacy skills in the areas of legislative research; drafting bills, and building politically powerful support or opposition to proposed legislative vehicles. It will also help students understand California's policy landscape, including State legislative, budget and administrative policy processes. The course will require students to work in teams on practical exercises building toward their final project.

LAW 865S
Problem Solving in Public Interest Law

2 Unit(s)

What is social justice advocacy? Who is a cause lawyer? Who is a public interest lawyer? Are these definitions fluid? Why does it matter? What is a public interest cause? How is it similar or different from other legal problems? What are the tools to solve these issues? What is your role (as a budding lawyer) in the public interest world? How do you achieve that goal? Building on the students' extensive and varied work experiences, this course examines these questions and others in a systematic and critical analysis of public interest and social justice lawyering. The first part of the course will focus on the history of public interest law and examine contemporary lawyering prototypes and controversies. The second part of the course will discuss a few public interest/social justice/public policy/lawyering problems. Finally, the course will conclude by focusing two weeks on a "needs-assessment" for a community or non-profit organization/NGO of students' choosing. *Note this class is required for JD Flex students seeking to complete the Social Justice/Public Interest track. All JD Flex students are welcome to participate.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 867B
California Election Law

2 Unit(s)

The ballot initiative is a process of participatory democracy that enables citizens to directly enact new legislation or repeal existing laws. Today, a wide variety of hot button topics such as criminal justice policy, civil rights, and environmental protections are debated and decided by voters via ballot initiatives and referendums on the local level in San Francisco, statewide in California, and in 25 other states across the country. The class will provide students with an understanding of election law related to the constitutional and legal framework for ballot initiatives in California and the U.S. Students will learn the practical skills necessary to draft, critically analyze, and defend ballot initiatives for government, non-profit, or private clients interested in sponsoring legislation or challenging existing laws. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 869
California Legal Research

2 Unit(s)

This course demonstrates the structure and use of legal resources as they relate to California practice. The course goal is research proficiency, especially with electronic California legal materials. Each student is responsible for learning to use the electronic research tools, theories, and strategies presented by the instructors. Weekly exercises are assigned, and students may also be expected to complete either a semester research project or a shorter end-of-semester project to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of research skills. Paper and online resources will be compared to reveal their respective strengths and weaknesses, so students in this class can also expect to hone their skills in researching California printed legal materials. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 870D
Mindfulness for Lawyers

2 Unit(s)

Mindfulness for Lawyers will expose students to meditation and other contemplation methods through practice, reading and class discussion, to enable students to develop an awareness of the way the mind works according to current scientific thinking and ancient meditation-based treatises. This will form the foundation for an exploration of what it means not only to think like a lawyer, but also to think like a human being. In class and for homework students will have sanctioned time for quiet and reflection, which will allow their minds to become more tranquil, focused and visionary. From that platform students will learn how the cultivation of tranquility, focus and vision can improve essential lawyering skills like speaking, listening, reading, writing, analysis, counseling, negotiation and advocacy. Students will also experience how these qualities of mind can lower stress and create greater access to inspiration and happiness in the study and practice of law, and in general. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

LAW 871W
Water Law

3 Unit(s)

This class provides an overview of the legal framework and principles governing the ownership, use, and distribution of water. It covers topics that are national in scope, but it also emphasizes laws and issues unique to California. The class covers: surface water and ground water rights, riparian and appropriative water rights, California and federal water agencies, the federal Central Valley Project (CVP) and the California's State Water Project; interstate water compacts and international water allocation treaties, Native American water rights, instream flow requirements, the public trust doctrine, and California's water supply-land use legislation (SB 221 and SB 610). This course counts toward completion of the JD Upper Division Writing Requirement.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 872
International Law on Water, Fisheries, And Indigenous Rights

1 Unit(s)

This 1-unit course surveys the main sources of international law pertaining to water, fisheries and indigenous rights. In terms of water, these sources of international law include the United Nations Watercourses Convention, the United Nations Espoo Convention on Transboundary Environmental Impact Assessment, the 1944 Mexico-United States Waters Treaty on the Colorado River and the Rio Grande, and decisions of the International Court of Justice. In terms of fisheries, these sources of international law include the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the United Nations Agreement on Highly Migratory and Straddling Fish Stocks, the Canada-United States Pacific Salmon Treaty and the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). In terms of indigenous rights to water, fisheries and natural resources, these sources of international law include 1989 Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples, the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the 2003 Indigenous Peoples Water Declaration. There will be a two-hour final exam and a short (3-page) written assignment based on readings assigned for the class and an in-class exercise.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 873
Sports Law

2 Unit(s)

This is a survey course covering the many legal issues related to the sports industry-both professional and amateur sports. The course examines the legal relationships between athletes, teams, leagues, governing bodies, sports facilities, licensees, broadcasters, and fans. Legal issues covered include contracts, antitrust, labor, intellectual property, constitutional, tort law, and other areas of law. Sports industry financial and business issues are also covered.

LAW 874
Ecommerce and Product Counseling: A Consumer Protection Perspective

2 Unit(s)

This course will focus on legal and policy considerations related to e-commerce and consumer protection, and will allow students to develop practical lawyering skills from an in-house counsel perspective. With financial services as a use case, this course will cover topics such as FTC and CFPB guidance, UDAAP risks, privacy considerations, the TCPA and consumer consent, transmission of payments, digital contracting, and best practices for mobile app user interfaces. Although the course will highlight financial services, students will analyze novel e-commerce questions applicable to all industries (e.g., biometric authentication and geolocation tracking), and will draft agreements including terms of use and privacy policies.

LAW 875
Patent Law of the US

3 Unit(s)

This course offers an in-depth exploration of patent law and patent litigation practice. The course covers understanding of the patent document and the patent prosecution process, patent infringement, claim construction, requirements for patentability, defenses to patent infringement, and patent remedies. The course involves readings and discussions related to substantive patent law and practical exercises designed to teach the class how to litigate a patent case. These practical exercises include written pleadings, motions, and papers as well as in-class litigation exercises. A technical background is not required. This course satisfies a requirement of the Intellectual Property Law Certificate. Intellectual Property LLM students are required to take this course, Copyright Law of the US, or Trademark Law of the US. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 875A
International Patent Law

2 Unit(s)

This course provides students with an introduction to the contemporary administration and enforcement of international patent law. Given the current U.S. and international focus on the protection of international intellectual property and its impact on international trade, it should be of interest to all internationally oriented thinkers as well as intellectual property practitioners. The course is divided into an introductory section and a practical application section. The introductory section provides an overview of International Law and how Intellectual Property Law fits into that legal system. This introductory segment provides students with a basic understanding of fundamental principles of International Law and how it differs from domestic law. Typical subject matter will include areas such as fundamental concepts of International Law (customary law and treaty law) and the international institutions (such as the World Trade Organization - "WTO"), organizations (such as the World Intellectual Property Organization - "WIPO"), and agreements ( such as the WTO Agreement, the GATT, and the Patent Cooperation Treaty) that deal with the worldwide administration and enforcement of intellectual property rights. The practical application section allows students to apply what they have learned about these international institutions, organizations, and agreements to the solution of real-world administration enforcement issues. The practical application will entail case analyses and document preparation that provide the students with a practical skillset. While this course focuses on issues arising from the international registration and protection of patents, those issues are generally applicable to the international registration and protection of trademarks and copyrights as well. As such, this course is appropriate for all Intellectual Property students. This course does not require the technical or scientific background typically required of patent practitioners. The subject matter we will cover will typically be applicable (in principle) to all forms of intellectual property and adjustments can be made to include and accommodate other types of intellectual property protection as necessary. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

LAW 875C
Patent Litigation

2 Unit(s)

This course takes students through the stages of preparing patent infringement cases and non-infringement and validity defenses. The course focuses on issues and procedures that are unique to patent cases, such as venue, patent local rules modeled after those of the Northern District of California, claim construct ("Markman") procedures and hearings, overall litigation strategies, expert discovery, motion practice, Patent Trial and Appeal Board review as a significant part of litigation strategy.

LAW 876E
Ethical Prosecutions

1 Unit(s)

The number of wrongful criminal convictions is staggering. This course will explore the behavior of prosecutors and emphasize their unique ethical and social responsibilities in their multiple roles as advocates for the community, officers of the court, and seekers of justice. Exploring the unique role of the prosecutor includes investigative, pre-trial and trial responsibilities of the prosecutor. Students will experience, throughout the course, the prosecutor's interactions with law enforcement agencies, supervisors, defense counsel, victims and their families, as well as the charging decisions, witness preparation, case evaluation and re-assessment, and societal pressures of working in a government office. Ethical prosecutions (and prosecutors) too will reduce the number of wrongful convictions and travesties in our criminal justice system. This course would be invaluable to any student considering work as a prosecutor and informative for any student intending to become a criminal defense attorney.

LAW 884
Independent Study

12 Unit(s)

Students have the opportunity to do independent research under direct faculty supervision in areas of special interest. They may enroll in the project on a letter-grade or credit/no-credit basis after making arrangements to work with a faculty member and after receiving the approval of the associate dean for student services. Students must complete 60 total hours of research and writing for each unit. Unit value for the work is determined in conference with the supervising faculty member. Subject to certification, this course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a scholarly writing course if taken for 2 units. If taken for 1 unit, it does not meet the Upper Division Writing Requirement. Petition for Independent Study form is available on the law school website (http://law.ggu.edu/student-support/registrar/form s/).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 884H
HLP Independent Study

1 Unit(s)

Students have the opportunity to do independent research under direct faculty supervision in areas of special interest. They may enroll in the project on a letter-grade or credit/no-credit basis after making arrangements to work with a faculty member and after receiving the approval of the associate dean for student services. Students must complete 60 total hours of research and writing for each unit.

LAW 885B
Women's Employment Rights Clinic

23 Unit(s)

Students represent low-income clients with employment-related problems in areas including unpaid wages, discrimination and harassment, pregnancy disability, family and medical leave, and unemployment benefits. The clinic operates as a law office, with students practicing under direct faculty supervision. Clinic students must simultaneously enroll in the Women's Employment Rights Seminar (LAW-885S). This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite: All first-year courses. Corequisite: Evidence. Consent of the instructor is required for Clinic enrollment.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 885C
Transactional Drafting

2 Unit(s)

In this course, students will develop fundamental transactional skills inherent in all areas of law practice through negotiating, designing, drafting, and evaluating agreements, licenses, and leases. Students will study and learn: the components of agreements; the proper use of forms and boilerplate terms; how to draft precisely; how to design a deal; the importance of and how to conduct due diligence; and negotiation tactics and ethics. Working individually and in teams, students will evaluate and critique language and provisions in a range of contracts, research applicable law to ensure enforceability of key provisions, draft due diligence and deal design memos, and negotiate and draft agreements and licenses. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 885G
Gender Based Violence Seminar

2 Unit(s)

Sexual violence in the home, in the public space and in the workforce is a significant problem in the United States and around the world. This is a research and writing seminar in which each student (and the professor) will engage in an in-depth legal research project resulting in a paper of publishable quality within the broad topic of gender-based violence law. Using primarily law review articles we will study current legal and social issues surrounding gender-based violence and the intersections of race, gender, ability and sexual identity. We will consider these issues under U.S. law, international law and learn how other countries address these problems. Students will hone their critical thinking, analytical and written and oral communication skills as well as their understanding of gender-based violence. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

LAW 885H
Comparative #MeToo

2 Unit(s)

This course explores gender-based violence around the globe through the lens of the #MeToo Movement. Tarana Burke coined the powerful term "me too" as part of her work supporting survivors of sexual violence, in particular girls and women of color. Upon the revelation about the conduct of former Hollywood movie producer, Harvey Weinstein, actress and survivor Alyssa Milano used social media to encourage survivors of sexual violence to post "#MeToo." The response was tremendous. In addition to discussing the response in the US, we will also study responses and backlashes in other countries. We will consider a number of questions, including: what is the range of definitions of gender-based violence? What have been the demands of women and other survivors? What have been the obstacles to change? What have been the forms of backlash experienced by feminists and other reformers?

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 885S
Women's Employment Rights Seminar

2 Unit(s)

The Women's Employment Rights Seminar is a required companion course for students enrolled in the Women's Employment Rights Clinic (LAW-885B). The course addresses employment law issues affecting low wage workers, focusing on both California and federal law. Substantive law areas include: overview of employment discrimination law, workplace harassment, wage and hour law, pregnancy discrimination, Family and Medical Leave Act, unemployment insurance benefits, disability discrimination, ethical issues in employment law, and wrongful termination. The seminar includes skills training components on client interviewing and counseling, case theory development, and administrative filing and hearing practice. The seminar is open to second and third-year students.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 886
Startup Transactions

2 Unit(s)

This course teaches students the core concepts necessary to draft and understand basic transactional agreements through the lens of agreements used by startups to grow and protect their businesses. The course will emphasize a practical approach to transactional legal work, and will teach students to spot gaps between contractual language and the business purpose of an agreement, as well as provide students with a framework to balance business goals with the mitigation of legal risk. This course counts toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement as a practice-based writing course.

LAW 891
Trademark Law of the US

3 Unit(s)

This course covers US trademark law and the role trademark protection plays in interstate commerce. Students explore the legal issues arising from the registration process with special attention to the business perspectives on trademark protection. The course also examines the interaction between domain names and trademarks and the general impact of the Internet on trademark law. Intellectual Property LL.M. students are required to take this course, Copyright Law of the US or Patent Law of the US.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 894D
Toxics & Brownfield Law

2 Unit(s)

This course is intended to provide students with an overview of the laws, policies and issues regarding the introduction of hazardous chemicals and pesticides into the marketplace, and the subsequent handling and release of hazardous chemicals and storage and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes. The course will also study the investigation and remediation of chemical releases, including examining cleanup and redevelopment of "Brownfields." Students will also review how these environmental issues impact purchase and sale of real property and how proper due diligence and allocation of liability can be handled in transactions involving contaminated property.

LAW 895A
Curricular Practical Training (JD)

0 Unit(s)

Qualified international students in valid visa status may obtain practical training by participating in clinical programs, legal internships and externships, and law clerk positions under the guidance of a faculty adviser. To qualify, students must demonstrate competence in legal writing and research and obtain written authorization from an international student adviser. May be taken a maximum of three times. Open only to upper division JD students. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Students wishing to enroll must obtain approval from the Law School's Designated Official in order to enroll.

LAW 896A
Externship: Civil Field Placement

28 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice civil litigation or transactional work at private or non-profit law offices, government agencies, or in the legal departments of businesses. During Fall and Spring semesters, class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM via Zoom. During the Summer session, class entails a full-day orientation class, and an online component, rather than weekly class meetings. Students may earn 2-8 credits and the class is offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at http://law.ggu.edu/academics/clinics/externships/.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896B
Externship: Advanced

28 Unit(s)

This course is open to students who are repeating an externship in the same field of practice. It is online-only and includes both webinar and field work components. Online, students build on skills developed in prior externships, engage in discussion, and reflect on progressive goals and performance. In the field, students continue their practice in criminal or civil litigation, transactional work, or in their judicial placements. Fieldwork can, but does not need to be, in the same office as the previous externship. All sessions are online-only. Students may earn 2-8 credits per semester. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externship web page found at http://law.ggu.edu/academics/clinics/externships/.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896C
Externship: Judicial

28 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice research, writing, and engage with the neutral aspect of litigation. During Fall and Spring semesters, class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM via Zoom. During the Summer session, class entails a full-day orientation class, and an online component, rather than weekly class meetings. Minimum G.P.A. requirements are 2.5 for state court and 2.75 for federal court. Students may earn 2-8 credits. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at http://law.ggu.edu/academics/clinics/externships/. Prerequisite: Evidence.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896F
Externship: Criminal Litigation

28 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice criminal litigation in private practice or government agencies. During Fall and Spring semesters, class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM via Zoom. During the Summer session, class entails a full-day orientation class, and an online component, rather than weekly class meetings. Students may earn 2-8 credits. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at http://law.ggu.edu/academics/clinics/externships/. Co-requisite: Evidence.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896I
Externship: Immigration Clinic

25 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components. The clinic will be 100% online for Fall 2020. In class, students learn the intricacies of immigration law practice. In the field, students engage in a clinical experience with attorney supervision as they work with clients who are seeking relief in the form of asylum, U-visas, and other types of humanitarian relief. The classes and clinics are held on Thursday evenings. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Students must submit the required Application by the deadline to enroll and all Applications are subject to approval by the Externship Director. The Application deadline is posted on the externships web page found at http://law.ggu.edu/academics/clinics/externships/ It is recommended to take LAW 842A or LAW 842D or LAW 706A prior to enrolling in this course

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896M
Externship: Cannabis Law Clinic

23 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components. The clinic will be 100% online for Spring 2020. In class, students learn the fundamentals of cannabis law practice. In the field, students engage in a clinical experience with attorney supervision as they advise clients on how to obtain cannabis operator licenses through the Equity Program. Students also will advise clients on all aspects of the cannabis industry, including regulatory, tax, contract, and intellectual property issues. The classes and clinics are held on Thursday evenings. The course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit. Basis. Students must submit the required Application by the deadline to enroll and all Applications are subject to approval by the Externship Director.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 896R
Externship: Consumer Rights

2 Unit(s)

This course includes both classroom and field work components held at the Justice & Diversity Center of the Bar Association of San Francisco. In class, students learn how to defend against debt-collection lawsuits. In the field, students engage in a clinical practice with attorney supervision as they advocate for clients sued by creditors. The classes and clinics are held on selected Wednesday evenings and also on the last Saturday of the month. Students earn 2 credits, but those who are certified by the State Bar's Practical Training of Law Students program may petition instructor for a third credit. This course is offered in Spring and is restricted to part-time students during priority registration. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement and is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Students may enroll directly without additional externship application via GGU4You.

LAW 897A
Civil Litigation - PreTrial Phase

2 Unit(s)

Students handle every aspect of pretrial preparation of a civil lawsuit. They proceed from the initial client contact, through formulating client representational strategy, to developing a case theory. They draft all the case pleadings as well as motions challenging the sufficiency of the pleadings. The course ends with a pre-trial settlement conference.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 897B
Introduction to Depositions

1 Unit(s)

Most civil lawsuits are won and lost in discovery. Develop a strong foundation for one of the most critical phases of civil pretrial discovery - the deposition. Learn techniques and strategies developed to maximize your time during a deposition and to get at the heart of the other side's case. This course will cover how to prepare for a deposition, effectively use documents during a deposition, deal with difficult counsel, and defend against a deposition.

LAW 897D
Overcoming Civil Litigation Obstacles

2 Unit(s)

Real-life cases illustrate the unexpected twists and turns a civil case can take and the strategies employed to prevail. Using actual trial court case examples and milestone appellate decisions, students will apply creative strategies in role-playing exercises and written work assignments often assigned to associate attorneys: opinion letters, motions, reports to clients, and appellate briefs. Guest lecturers will provide diverse perspectives on how a recently-admitted lawyer can make a difference.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 897F
Introduction to Civil Litigation

1 Unit(s)

This course brings the legal principles learned in introductory courses into the real world of litigation, from the moment a new client calls to the eve of trial. Students will learn to think, write, and advocate like a litigator through interactive exercises. In this hands-on course students will write motions, present oral argument, develop a trial book, create a case budget, and learn the fine art of persuasion. To the extent that pre-trial strategies are designed for end-game outcomes-settlement, trial, or appeal-those phases of litigation will be more briefly discussed. Students will also learn what daily life is like in a litigating law office, and become better able to plan their career path in the law.

LAW 897J
Introduction to Jury Selection

1 Unit(s)

You've lived with the case for years, immersed in every little detail. But now it's time for trial: what will a jury think? This course will teach you how to think through your case like a juror and prepare it for a lay audience, how to write and conduct effective voir dire to identify (and strike) problematic or biased jurors, and how to strategically select the best jury you can.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 897K
Criminal Litigation - PreTrial Phase

2 Unit(s)

Criminal Litigation is designed to give students a thorough examination of each stage in the lifespan of a criminal case. The course will be begin with a spirited discussion over how and when charges are filed, explore pre-trial motions to admit and suppress evidence, and give the students hands-on training for conducting voir dire. The goal of the course is to preview for students what criminal litigators do on an everyday basis.

LAW 897L
Introduction to Criminal Litigation

2 Unit(s)

Apply the skills learned in Trial Advocacy in the context of a criminal case. The class is divided into trial teams assigned to prosecution or defense. The class begins with the staging of a mock crime, it is reported, a suspect is arrested, charges are filed, and the prosecution commences. The class proceeds through major phases of a criminal trial.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 897W
Introduction to Expert Witnesses

1 Unit(s)

The Expert Witness course introduces you to hiring, deposing, and obtaining trial testimony from an expert in a real case. During class, you will prepare your witness to give a deposition, practice voir dire, and prepare a cross examination for the opposing expert. You will also learn the applicable FRE, FRCP and case law. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite: Evidence and Trial Advocacy.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 899B
Trial Advocacy

3 Unit(s)

This is the entry course for the litigation program, and it teaches the basic skills needed by every lawyer going to court: conducting a direct examination of a witness, introducing documents and physical evidence, cross-examining witnesses, making and answering objections, and preparing opening statements and closing arguments. Much of the students' work is videotaped. The final examination for this course is a full trial conducted in a local courthouse. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite/Corequisite (depending on the instructor): Evidence.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 899E
Competition: Traynor Moot Court

2 Unit(s)

The Roger J. Traynor California Moot Court Competition is a prestigious interscholastic moot court competition open to California law schools. The competition is designed to provide students with a learning experience that reflects contemporary appellate practice in California, and it uses an edited record from an actual California Court of Appeal case. A team of two or three students will prepare and submit an appellate brief representing one side, and present oral arguments representing both sides. Enrollment in this course is limited to members of the Moot Court Board. Students may not enroll without permission from the Director of the Legal Writing & Research program. Students receive 2 units in the spring semester. Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 899F
Advanced Trial Advocacy

2 Unit(s)

This course is intended for students interested in pursuing careers in litigation. This trial advocacy concentration provides advanced practical techniques and promotes mastery of the courtroom. Utilizing case strategies, students will hone their courtroom skills by presenting simulated trials and learning proper utilization of technology during different phases of trial. Students will be introduced to a variety of witnesses, including expert testimony, and learn effective methods for examination. Writing assignments will focus on advanced procedural and evidentiary issues. Class size will be limited. Prerequisite: Trial Advocacy or STEP or permission of the professor.

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 899G
Competition: Mock Trial

12 Unit(s)

This course is open only to students who have been selected by the instructor to represent the law school in an inter-school mock trial competition. The number of mock trial competitions, and corresponding student competitors, varies from year to year. Selection to compete in mock trial competitions will be based upon an application and tryout open to all upper division students who have completed Evidence and have completed or are currently enrolled in Trial Advocacy. Consent of the instructor is required for registration in this course. Prerequisite: Evidence, Co-requisite: Trial Advocacy.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 899I
Competition: Environmental Law Moot Court

12 Unit(s)

In this two-semester course, students participate in the annual nationally recognized Jeffrey G. Miller National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition held at Pace University School of Law. This course presents a unique opportunity to build practical writing and oral presentation skills that are essential in attorneys' everyday practice. All students enrolled in the course receive 2 units in the fall semester and 1 unit in the spring semester. This course will meet as a class twice a week - please check the course schedule for the days and times. Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 899J
Competition: Advanced Mock Trial

2 Unit(s)

This course is open only to students who have been selected by the instructor to represent the law school in an inter-school mock trial competition. The number of mock trial competitions, and corresponding student competitors, varies from year to year. Selection to compete in mock trial competitions will be based upon an application and tryout open to all upper division students who have completed Evidence and have completed or are currently enrolled in Trial Advocacy. Consent of the instructor is required for registration in this course. Prerequisite: Evidence. Co-requisite: Trial Advocacy.

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022

LAW 899K
Competition: ABA National Appellate Advocacy Moot Court

12 Unit(s)

In the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition (NAAC), students develop written and oral advocacy skills by participating in a hypothetical appeal to the United States Supreme Court. A team of 2-3 students will write a brief as either respondent or petitioner and then present oral argument on behalf of both sides. Enrollment in this course is limited to members of the Moot Court Board. Students may not enroll without permission from the Director of the Legal Writing & Research program. Team members receive 2 units in the spring semester. If there is an alternate team member, the alternate receives 1 unit in the spring semester. Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023

LAW 899L
Competition: USD Nat'l Criminal Proc

12 Unit(s)

In the USD National Criminal Procedure Tournament, students develop written and oral advocacy skills by participating in a hypothetical appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. The appeal involves challenging and timely issues of criminal procedure. A team of 2 students will write a brief as either respondent or petitioner and then present several oral arguments. Enrollment in this course is limited to members of the Moot Court Board. To enroll, students must obtain permission from the faculty advisor to the Moot Court Board. Students receive 2 units in the fall semester. Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

View Course Sections: Fall 2022

LAW 899M
Competition: Jessup International Law Moot Court

12 Unit(s)

In this two-semester course, students argue timely questions of international law before the International Court of Justice, which is the primary judicial organ of the United Nations. Students compete against teams from 700 law schools in 100 different countries. Students draft written pleadings and present oral arguments representing both sides of a hypothetical dispute between nations. All students enrolled in this course receive 2 units in the fall semester and 1 unit in the spring semester. Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

LAW 899T
Competition: IP Law Moot Court

12 Unit(s)

In this two-semester course, law students participate in the Saul Lefkowitz Moot Court Competition, which focuses on trademark law problems. Students are coached by faculty in basic trademark legal issues and in oral advocacy skills. Students draft a brief in the fall semester (2 units) and present oral argument in the first half of the spring semester (1 unit). Students selected to participate in the competition may receive credit toward completion of the Upper-Division Writing Requirement (practice-based).

View Course Sections: Spring 2023 , Fall 2022